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  #2961  
Old 10-12-2009, 07:08 PM
Dreamnine Dreamnine is offline
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The album was released on 24 February 1975, at a time when Led Zeppelin was undertaking its tenth concert tour of North America. Delays in the production of the album's sleeve design prevented its release prior to the commencement of the tour.[15]

Physical Graffiti was the band's first release on their own Swan Song Records label, which had been launched in May 1974. Until this point, all of Led Zeppelin's albums had been released on Atlantic Records. The album was a commercial and critical success, having built up a huge advance order, and when eventually released it reached #1 on Billboard's Pop Albums chart. It has since proven to be one of the most popular releases by the group, selling 8 million copies in the United States alone (which has made it 16 times platinum as it is a double album). Physical Graffiti was the first album to go platinum on advance orders alone.[16] Shortly after its release, all previous Led Zeppelin albums simultaneously re-entered the top-200 album chart.[17]

Billboard magazine's 5 star review of the album stated: "[Physical Graffiti] is a tour de force through a number of musical styles, from straight rock to blues to folky acoustic to orchestral sounds."[18] In 1998 Q magazine readers voted Physical Graffiti the 28th greatest album of all time; in 2000 Q placed it at number 32 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever; and in 2001 the same magazine named it as one of the 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time. In 2003 the TV network VH1 named it the 71st greatest album ever. In 2003, the album was ranked number 70 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. The album is also listed in Robert Dimery and Stevie Chick's 1001 Albums You Must Hear Before You Die (2005).
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  #2962  
Old 10-12-2009, 07:36 PM
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War (Deluxe Edition) Bonus CD - U2 = 2 out of 5 stars


Most of the CD is remixes and edits of songs on the CD but they're is a few B sides and live tracks that are excellent.
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  #2963  
Old 10-12-2009, 08:00 PM
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Emilie Autumn - Opheliac (2006)



Last.fm review:

Quote:
Emilie Autumn (born September 22nd, 1979 in Malibu, California, United States, currently residing in Chicago) is a violinist, singer-songwriter, and poet. She is best known for her wide range of musical styles, especially her usage of theatrics.

Autumn started learning the violin at the age of four, and trained in conservatories as a composer, conductor, and music historian, but moved into popular music. After spending a summer in France recording with Courtney Love, Autumn was invited to join Love’s touring band, The Chelsea. She quickly gained attention as a solo performer, and was chosen as one of Interview Magazine’s “14 to Be”, a pictorial featuring fourteen up-and-coming young female stars.

After walking away from her first major label contract at the age of eighteen, Autumn returned to her classical roots and released her solo violin debut album, recorded when she was seventeen, On a Day…, with the label she created and still controls, Traitor Records. Since the creation of her own production company, Autumn has branched out to create a number of side projects (The Jane Brooks Project, RavenSong, and Convent).
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Chick tries to sound like Rasputina.
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  #2964  
Old 10-15-2009, 07:35 PM
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Muse - The Resistance (2009)




The over the top, prog-rock histrionics of Devonshire, England’s Muse certainly aren’t for everybody, and there seems to be a definite line drawn firmly in the sand between the band’s detractors and their supporters. That line is only bound to get more defined with the release of the trio’s relentlessly theatrical new record, The Resistance, which expands and augments the dramatic, grandiose soundscapes of their previous album, 2006’s hugely successful but equally divisive Black Holes And Revelations.

Muse have never shied away from ambitious (some would say overly so) songwriting, and in doing so the band has crafted a challenging career arc that saw them going from being called Radiohead knockoffs early on to being accused of aping Queen on their new record. While there are certainly hints within their music to support these accusations, Muse are far too inventive and experimental to get bogged down by platitudinous comparisons, and have usually been two steps ahead of their critics throughout their nearly 15 year career. It seems like their only real goal with each successive album is to find more creative ways to get their sound louder and more massive, which certainly can be a challenge for a three-piece band (they tour with an additional keyboardist to broaden their live sound), but their scope and subject matter has always gravitated towards the celestial, and their sonic boundaries, for better or for worse, are often without limits.

The Resistance
starts out with the most straight ahead rock song found on the album, the arena ready anthem “Uprising,” which has a futuristic dance beat created by bassist Chris Wolstenholme layered underneath front man Matt Bellamy’s frenetic guitar work and paranoid call-to-arms vocals. There has been a definite us vs. them mentality that has built up over the course of Muse’s last few records, and The Resistance is no exception, with lyrics demanding that sides be chosen, for wars are being waged and we need to take up the fight before everything we know is taken from us. What specifically Bellamy is referring to is anybody’s guess, but with the volatile state of the world today, just pick a conflict or crusade and there is probably an allusion to it found within the lines on this record. But whatever the fight, Bellamy makes it abundantly clear on “Resistance” that, ultimately, “Love is our resistance.” The song is inspired by the romance between Winston and Julia from Orwell’s 1984, and the lyrics reflect that suspicious mindset as well as echoing Orwell’s belief that making love is the ultimate form of rebellion, at least while Big Brother is watching. Again, the song seems primed for a large scale live performance (which is true of just about all of Muse’s output in the last six years), and is an epic and soaring track about the defiance that comes from falling in love.

The record takes its first true stylistic shift on “Undisclosed Desires,” which features a robotic R&B beat on top of synthetic, orchestral keyboards. The song is a perfect example of the band being willing to try anything and taking chances musically, even if at times it falls a bit flat, like it does here. Even if you can’t appreciate the song itself, you can at least recognize the band’s ambition and audacity in trying something outside of their comfort zone. “Desires” ends up being a bit of an oblique mess, but it remains sonically arresting, and the production, handled exclusively by the band for the first time in their career, is impressive throughout the record. “United States Of Eurasia/Collateral Damage” was the first song released by the band prior to the album’s release, being made available as a free download via their website after an online treasure hunt. Upon first hearing the track I wasn’t sold on the direction they were taking on the new album, with obvious nods to both the musical hi-jinks of Queen and the subdued melancholy of Ravel within the song’s two parts. I still don’t like the “Eurasia” part of the track at all, but the spare, ruminative classical half of the song is a nice break from the aural gymnastics found on the rest of the record.

“Guiding Light” is all cheese, starting with its soap opera-ish title (even if the band might not fully be aware of the show) straight through to the out-of-the-80’s guitar solo. The band chose to completely indulge in their stadium rock sound on this track and show no shame in recycling riffs that have long since disappeared from modern music. Again, it’s audacious, but it doesn’t necessarily work for me. The song is just trying desperately to be anthemic, but its reach far exceeds its grasp, and it falls flat. “Unnatural Selection” gets things going back in the right direction, but so brazenly recycles Bellamy’s own riff from “New Born,” off of 2001’s Origin Of Symmetry, that some of the ferocity of the track is lost simply because I’ve heard it from them before. I get the cunning evolutionary tie-in lyrically between “New Born” and “Unnatural Selection,” but it’s hard to hear the band simply running in place while purloining their own sound. The two minute noodling at the end of the track also could be done away with as well, causing any momentum built up in the song to come to an abrupt end.


[uncredited group press shot via Muse]

“MK Ultra” finds Bellamy showing off his proficiency on the guitar, artfully changing speeds to fit the spirit of the song, while the excellent drumming of Dominic Howard keeps the track chugging right along (and the album for that matter, for Howard is one hell of a drummer). It’s the highlight of the second half of the album, and finds the band returning to more familiar ground musically while still maintaining their inventive tendencies. The jaunty piano of Bellamy guides the delicate framework of “I Belong to You/Mon cœur s’ouvre à ta voix,” which finds the band again indulging their grandiose proclivities, this time only in French (at least for half of the song). But it works simply because the self-seriousness of the vocals are offset by truly catchy piano and bass lines that make this track sound like it’s emanating from the cloudy parlors of Montmartre.

The album ends with a symphony of sorts, the fifteen minute, three-part symphonic piece, “Exogenesis,” that Bellamy has been tinkering with since Muse’s last record, with Matt deeming the work “too progressive for Black Holes & Revelations.” It comfortably finds its place here, closing out the album with a sprawling, piano-driven trio of songs that find Bellamy completely indulging his inner-Rachmaninoff and doing away with the conventional song structure found at the start of the album in favor of a return to the “glory days” of Richard Strauss. Its self-indulgent and excessive, sure, but it’s also a wildly inventive change in direction for a band tired of giving fans what they’ve come to expect. Or maybe fans have come to expect this sort of thing from Muse, simply because they never know what the band is going to do next. Either way, some will find this to be a perfect example of the outrageous conceit and pompousness that turned them off of Muse in the first place, while others will find this a shining paragon of why they love the band. I tend to fall into the later camp, identifying with the experimental, orchestral side of the band while respecting the fact that they are taking a chance like this on a major release.

Their musical lives certainly don’t hang in the balance with The Resistance by any means (they will continue to sell out any arena they choose to play in Europe and most of the world), but an experiment like this one is certainly bound to cost them a fair amount of fans and airplay. But the band doesn’t appear to be too concerned with those capitalistic-minded affairs, instead they are bound by, and dedicated to, their artistic vision, no matter how overblown it may seem to be. And while some of their risks don’t necessarily work on The Resistance, at least they are taking chances and not replicating the sound that garnered them the spotlight in the first place. And for that they at least deserve our respect, for this is an album with plenty of pay off when things start to click, and only focusing on the band’s missteps discredits their bold attempt at trying to make something larger than themselves. Whether or not the record or the band’s ambition is too large is simply a matter of taste, and ultimately depends on which side of the line in the sand you are on.

C/O Culturebully: http://www.culturebully.com/muse-the-resistance-review


Last edited by The DarkSide; 10-20-2009 at 04:00 PM. Reason: They stole my album art,..............
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  #2965  
Old 10-15-2009, 08:29 PM
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Goa Universe - The Top 50 of Psychedelic Trance



Freshly downloaded so I've only listened to a couple of tracks but it's been pretty beautiful so far.
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  #2966  
Old 10-20-2009, 08:16 AM
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happy mondays - pills 'n' thrills and bellyaches

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  #2967  
Old 10-20-2009, 08:20 AM
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The Stone Roses:


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  #2968  
Old 10-20-2009, 09:20 PM
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i felt compelled to post because of your "do as i say, not as i do" attitude that you exhibit on an all too regular basis in this thread. i saw your first post knowing full well that you had posted albums without reviews but i let it slide. but when you came back accusing people of being lazy when you're just as guilty yourself, i had to reply.

back on topic, i'm listening to

panda bear - person pitch



(and of course i'm not posting a review )
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  #2969  
Old 10-20-2009, 10:16 PM
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For once,I'm not on shuffle mode......

Reviewby Steve HueyDirt is Alice in Chains' major artistic statement and the closest they ever came to recording a flat-out masterpiece. It's a primal, sickening howl from the depths of Layne Staley's heroin addiction, and one of the most harrowing concept albums ever recorded. Not every song on Dirt is explicitly about heroin, but Jerry Cantrell's solo-written contributions (nearly half the album) effectively maintain the thematic coherence — nearly every song is imbued with the morbidity, self-disgust, and/or resignation of a self-aware yet powerless addict. Cantrell's technically limited but inventive guitar work is by turns explosive, textured, and queasily disorienting, keeping the listener off balance with atonal riffs and off-kilter time signatures. Staley's stark confessional lyrics are similarly effective, and consistently miserable. Sometimes he's just numb and apathetic, totally desensitized to the outside world; sometimes his self-justifications betray a shockingly casual amorality; his moments of self-recognition are permeated by despair and suicidal self-loathing. Even given its subject matter, Dirt is monstrously bleak, closely resembling the cracked, haunted landscape of its cover art. The album holds out little hope for its protagonists (aside from the much-needed survival story of "Rooster," a tribute to Cantrell's Vietnam-vet father), but in the end, it's redeemed by the honesty of its self-revelation and the sharp focus of its music. [Some versions of Dirt feature "Down in a Hole" as the next-to-last track rather than the fourth.]
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  #2970  
Old 10-21-2009, 07:18 AM
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Transitional - Nothing Real Nothing Absent (2008)



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Transitional is the new project of musician producer Kevin Laska ( Novatron ) and long time Justin K Broadrick and Kevin Martin collaborator Dave Cochrane (Jesu, Grey Machine, ')

The debut 'Nothing real Nothing Absent' offers a rich variety in their approach to sound combining crushing atmospheres through a mixture of electronic ambience, mangling bass lines and distorted epic layers of textured guitar.
Injected with driving rhythms and effected vocal phrasing Laska and Cochrane build discordant worlds on an immense scale which pull you down to another level of fear and ethereal bliss before kicking off with some more soul dismantling sonic dysfunction.
This is a band which can deliver both sonic tranquility and extremely heavy slabs of dense music and just about everything in between; Heavy electronic machinery, juggernaut bass lines and hypnotic guitars go from passive relaxation to an unstoppable machine within a single surge.

Kevin Laska's woven creations of bleak electronic/organic mesmerizing mayhem and bliss has found a new level. Now joined by legendary bassist Dave Cochrane who played with the likes of Kevin Martin in God, Ice and The Bug and Justin Broadrick in Jesu and Head of David.
Born September 2006 Laska's found himself in another quality up with Cochrane, following his last collaboration with a.o. Russel Smith and Anthony Difranco (Ramleh, ex Skullflower) as Novatron. Transitional; a solid, textured and dynamic sonic journey through a world that is both self deprecating and enlightening, but either way leaves you wanting more.
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  #2971  
Old 10-24-2009, 01:54 PM
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Stevie Wonder - Innervisions:


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  #2972  
Old 10-24-2009, 01:58 PM
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Khlyst - Chaos Is My Name (2006)



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Khlyst is the New York City, NY, United States based drone / doom metal project between James Plotkin (ex-Khanate), Runhild Gammelsæter (ex-Thorr’s Hammer) and Tim Wyskida (ex-Khanate, Blind Idiot God).

The debut album, “Chaos Is My Name” / “Kaos Er Mitt Navn” (dually titled in English and Norwegian) was released in October 2006 on Hydra Head.
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  #2973  
Old 10-24-2009, 02:04 PM
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[13:51] <WalkGood> :: WinAmp :: Reds for the Blue Sun :: 00:16/05:56 [<<<<<<<<<<] :: 192kb/s @ 44KHz :: 1/1 ::
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  #2974  
Old 10-24-2009, 02:05 PM
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Heh, I wonder what that could be?
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  #2975  
Old 10-24-2009, 02:10 PM
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Originally Posted by dfkt View Post
Heh, I wonder what that could be?
A new sensation group of badass Austrians very good btw
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  #2976  
Old 10-25-2009, 07:35 AM
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Rob Zombie: Past, Present & Future

by Adrien Begrand




Back in 1992, when grunge was at its peak, the rock world shifting suddenly from teased hair and power ballads to flannel and sensitive guy lyrics, I remember seeing a television interview with Kiss mastermind Gene Simmons. He was asked who his favorite new band was, and without a moment's hesitation, he replied, "White Zombie". Amidst the maudlin rock music that was coming out at the time, White Zombie was such a relief to those who missed the campy shock rock of the likes of Alice Cooper, Kiss, W.A.S.P., and to a lesser extent, Mötley Crüe. Here was some brutally heavy, yet incredibly catchy music that reveled in B-movie kitsch, embracing metal, industrial, and even disco, while referencing slasher movies and Russ Meyer flicks. It was like a twisted, unholy mix of The Misfits, Ministry, KC & the Sunshine Band, The Crazy World of Arthur Brown, Parliament, and The Carrie Nations (of Beyond the Valley of the Dolls notoriety), and as evidenced by such insipid choruses as "Devil man! Devil man!", the humor was always there in the music.

At the helm of it all was one Robert Cummings, known by millions as Rob Zombie. When White Zombie disbanded, and Zombie himself launched his solo career, it was clear that he was the sole driving force in the band, as his solo efforts sounded like mere continuations of the White Zombie sound. While he went on to dabble in such things as film directing, creating an action figure with Todd MacFarlane, and forming a production company that will develop feature films, video games, comics, books, and music, as far as his own music was concerned, Zombie wasn't exactly prolific, as he put out only four White Zombie/Rob Zombie albums in ten years (not counting the two lackluster remix discs). As his feature directorial debut House of 1000 Corpses attests, his strengths lie in his music, which, despite sticking to the same reliable formula for more than a decade, never fails to get your attention from time to time. Now that the man is busy planning the sequel to his film, it's as good a time as any for him to compile a definitive Rob Zombie retrospective, and the resulting disc, Past, Present, & Future does not disappoint.


Let's face it, all of his albums get a bit repetitive once you listen to them, getting bogged down with filler, so this new compilation, featuring 17 of his best tracks (and two new ones), works brilliantly. Spanning his four albums for Geffen (primarily the singles), as well as numerous soundtrack contributions, this rousing album pummels you for an hour and a quarter, the contagious beats, the churning guitars, and Zombie's sinister growl, all relentless.


Although White Zombie's first three independently released albums are ignored, it's great to see that their last two records weren't. After all, it was La Sexorcisto: Devil Music Vol. 1 that introduced the masses to Mr. Zombie in 1992. "Thunder Kiss '65" is still as cool as ever, a grinding, groovy tribute to the great black and white Russ Meyer films from the mid-'60s, like Faster Pussycat, Kill! Kill!, Mudhoney, and Motorpsycho, even boasting a classic Tura Satana dialogue sample. "Black Sunshine" is just as fun, as Iggy Pop makes an appearance, reciting Zombie's own B-movie lines: "True death: 400 horsepower of maximum performance piercing the night/This is black sunshine." 1995's Astro Creep 2000 had the band going into a more dance-oriented, sample-laden direction, yielding the unlikely hit "More Human Than Human" (I'm still puzzled why it was so popular) and the much more superior "Super Charger Heaven", a sound Zombie would continue to develop on his subsequent solo efforts.


Zombie's Hellbilly Deluxe remains his finest hour, as he and producer Scott Humphrey carry the sound over the top, an all-out orgy of metal, dance, and sampling. Only a guy like Rob Zombie could get away with recording a tribute to Herman Munster's hot rod, and the insanely catchy "Dragula" has become the man's most famous song. "Living Dead Girl" is a great combination of dance music and horror movie themes, while "Superbeast" is the kind of chuggin' shock rock that Zombie has become a master at. The 2001 album The Sinister Urge, while a bit of a letdown, both musically and commercially, still holds its own, as proven by such selections as "Feel So Numb", "Never Gonna Stop (The Red Red Kroovy)", and "Demon Speeding".


No less than six songs on the compilation come from soundtracks. There are collaborations with the likes of Alice Cooper ("Hands of Death") and Howard Stern ("The Great American Nightmare"), but by far the most noteworthy of the bunch are the wickedly groovy cover of KC & the Sunshine Band's "I'm Your Boogieman" from The Crow 2 soundtrack, and the truly surreal, raunchy version of The Commodores' "Brick House" (From House of 1000 Corpses), with none other than Lionel Richie dueting with Zombie. The two new songs hold up well; "Two Lane Blacktop", inspired by the James Taylor movie of the same name, and "Girl on Fire" are the usual schtick we've come to expect, but are still loads of fun.


If that weren't enough, the album comes with a bonus DVD, featuring ten music videos, including three previously unreleased clips, and since the two-disc set is selling for the price of a single CD, it's a tremendous bargain for fans. Aside from the clunky, awkward cover of The Ramones' "Blitzkrieg Bop", Past, Present, & Future is as excellent as a greatest hits compilation as you'll find anywhere. Longtime fans would do well to buy this for the DVD, but for first-timers, this album is all the Rob Zombie they'll ever need. And everyone needs something like this in their music collection.

— 26 January 2004

Review C/O popmatters: http://www.popmatters.com/music/revi...rob-past.shtml
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  #2977  
Old 10-25-2009, 07:49 AM
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Quote:
The fact he persists in making music when his career could have crashed and burned following his 2003 Australian Idol victory deserves kudos. The trouble for Guy Sebastian, however, is that he hasn’t found a sound he’s comfortable with – until now.

Ironically, after attempts at mainstream pop, modern rnb, rock and piano ballads, Sebastian came into his own with the release of The Memphis Album in 2007 – a covers record, no less. Working with musicians of the Motown era and surrounding himself with its sounds, Sebastian was inspired far more than the passable dross of songs like "Out With My Baby" and "Angels Brought Me Here".

So when it came to creating his fifth album, Like It Like That, Sebastian knew he could throw something at the wall that would finally stick. As a result, Like It Like That is easily his most consistent record of original material. This is a slick, smoothly-arranged album that will please the followers of his pop roots as well as fans of his newer soul-infused sounds.

By now, you’ve most likely heard the album’s title track, which opens the record with a twist and a bang. Hands down the best single of Guy’s career, the song gallivants through surf guitar, Bo Diddley rhythms and that stupidly catchy chorus in a whirlwind three-and-a-half minutes. Despite being a highlight of the album, one can view the song as the exorcising of Sebastian’s pop demons – the majority of Like It Like That makes its home in self-penned homage to Motown, soul and doo-wop.

For the first time in Sebastian’s career, we have an album on our hands that, whilst flawed, can easily be listened to start-to-finish. While previous original material efforts felt forced and uncomfortable, Guy has never sounded happier to be singing his own stuff. "All To Myself" streamlines close harmony and tight, funky drums underneath a fantastic vocal delivery. Meanwhile, "Attention" sees the horn section storm through in the limelight as Sebastian himself schools the neo-soul movement with pizzazz and class.

Indeed, the best songs here are the upbeat, highly danceable numbers that, whilst obviously derivative, present Guy as the most relaxed, and subsequently confident, he has ever been. This isn’t to discredit the moves into ballad territory entirely, though. Sure, the head-scratching modern rnb of "Art of Love" (complete with AutoTuned backing vocals) was very much an ill-advised move. And the ballads dedicated to his newly-wed wife – "Fail to Mention" and "Perfection" – are far too sappy for their own good, despite the best of intentions.

For what it’s worth, however, "Bring Yourself" proves to be a powerful highlight of the album. A soulful 6/8 ballad in the spirit of Sam Cooke or Nat King Cole, Sebastian takes the lyrical role of a lover disinterested in the monetary and materialistic gains of his lover. “Just bring yourself,” he simplistically pleads as the string sections soars and sweeps. Forget the faux-romantic lines of Guy’s back catalogue like, “I’m out with my baby” or “I’m addicted to this elevator love”- this is genuine baby-makin’ music right here.

It’s taken three albums of style over substance and a career-defining covers record to get Guy Sebastian to the point that he needs to be in his career. Finally, an Australian Idol winner has made good on the promise of their potential. Erase your premonitions and enjoy.
(Link)

It's being played on Rove. Apparently the opening song "Like it like that" was apart of some television program's add for the summer shows in America
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  #2978  
Old 10-27-2009, 04:33 PM
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David Bowie has never been shy about acknowledging his influences, and since the boho decadence and sexual ambiguity of the Velvet Underground's music had a major impact on Bowie's work, it was only fitting that as Ziggy Stardust mania was reaching its peak, Bowie would offer Lou Reed some much needed help with his career, which was stuck in neutral after his first solo album came and went. Musically, Reed's work didn't have too much in common with the sonic bombast of the glam scene, but at least it was a place where his eccentricities could find a comfortable home, and on Transformer Bowie and his right-hand man, Mick Ronson, crafted a new sound for Reed that was better fitting (and more commercially astute) than the ambivalent tone of his first solo album. Ronson adds some guitar raunch to "Vicious" and "Hangin' Round" that's a lot flashier than what Reed cranked out with the Velvets, but still honors Lou's strengths in guitar-driven hard rock, while the imaginative arrangements Ronson cooked up for "Perfect Day," "Walk on the Wild Side," and "Goodnight Ladies" blend pop polish with musical thinking just as distinctive as Reed's lyrical conceits. And while Reed occasionally overplays his hand in writing stuff he figured the glam kids wanted ("Make Up" and "I'm So Free" being the most obvious examples), "Perfect Day," "Walk on the Wild Side," and "New York Telephone Conversation" proved he could still write about the demimonde with both perception and respect. The sound and style of Transformer would in many ways define Reed's career in the 1970s, and while it led him into a style that proved to be a dead end, you can't deny that Bowie and Ronson gave their hero a new lease on life — and a solid album in the bargain.


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  #2979  
Old 10-31-2009, 09:47 AM
Dreamnine Dreamnine is offline
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John Cougar and the American listening public became inseparable after this landmark album arrived in 1982. While AMERICAN FOOL wasn't John Cougar's first full-length recording, it was the one wherein he gained commercial and artistic footing, and established a formula that would become his trademark style--simple roots-rock melodies with stirring choruses, unguardedly emotional vocals, and lyrics that reflect the experiences of the common man.

Album opener "Hurts So Good" is a playful rocker (with a dangerously catchy refrain) that has become part of the pop canon, and "Jack & Diane" is one of the great slice-of-life songs of the '80s. While both songs loom large, other overlooked treasures include "China Girl," with its cheeky faux-Chinese guitar riff, and the ballad "Weakest Moments," which blends transcendent acoustic-guitar changes with a gorgeous, careworn melody. Here and elsewhere on this well-written record, Cougar proves he's nobody's fool.
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  #2980  
Old 10-31-2009, 06:58 PM
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eboyer93 eboyer93 is offline
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Wheels - Foo Figthers = 5 out of 5 Stars = a great Foo Fighters song.

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