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  #1  
Old 04-14-2013, 03:16 AM
rsa2013 rsa2013 is offline
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Red face Less 'sensitive' headphones needed

I bought a new cell phone, the HTC One with Beats Audio, marketed as a phone with great audio qualities. Unfortunately, there seems to be some electromagnetic interference present and it is a problem shared with many HTC One V owners. Apparrantly nothing can be done about this to fix it.

I have tried several in-ear headphones (philips, logitech, soundmagic) and it seems that some earphones pick up this EMI more than others. My best earphones, the Soundmagic E10, seem to pick up the EMI the most.

My question is: which in-ear headphones are a lot less sensitive to pick up EMI. On my previous cell, the Sony-Ericsson Xperia was sold with some in-ear phones that seem to be a lot less sensitive. Unfortunately, they don't work on the HTC due to a different plug standard.

Any advice?

R
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  #2  
Old 04-17-2013, 11:09 AM
Chef Chef is offline
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Uhm... I know that usually if there is hiss there is a problem with the amp being kinda crappy and the earphones not having enough impedance to tolerate it. Sometimes earphones have extremely low impedance that they are sensitive even to normal Class D amps. I am not sure if that's what's going on here, but if you use the word 'sensitive' in headphone talk, that's usually what it refers to.

Impedance is measured in ohms, and there are plenty of earphones, especially from Sennheiser at about 32 ohms, which is plenty. Lots of earphones have about 16, normally. Headphones can go much higher.

I think you should be wary of something marketed for it's audio quality, especially if many users say they experience hiss issues. It means something is bad about the amp, most of the time. It's not really good audio quality if the amp hisses! "Beats" is not a particularly reputable company by this forum's standards either, I'm sorry to say.

Check the ohms on the earphones you've tried and see if they are particularly low, and if none of them are 32, try getting something about that range. If it still doesn't work, try to return your phone on the grounds that it is marketed for good sound quality and yet hisses. Maybe you can challenge them to find an earphone that doesn't hiss with the phone for you. I know that usually phones are not that easy to get rid of, so you might just be stuck with it ;p gl
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Old 04-17-2013, 01:09 PM
rsa2013 rsa2013 is offline
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Okay, thanks for the advice!
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Old 04-19-2013, 08:41 AM
Sleep mode zZ Sleep mode zZ is offline
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Least sensitive IEM that I have is Sony MH1c. It's a headset for Android phones.

Even less sensitive could be phones with an analogue volume control. I don't know if there exists such IEMs.

Sensitivity rating is a more direct indication of sensitivity than impedance. It can be measured in dB/mW or dB/mV. Look for phones with as small rating as possible.
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Old 04-19-2013, 08:58 AM
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Marvin the Martian Marvin the Martian is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rsa2013 View Post
I bought a new cell phone, the HTC One with Beats Audio, marketed as a phone with great audio qualities. Unfortunately, there seems to be some electromagnetic interference present and it is a problem shared with many HTC One V owners. Apparrantly nothing can be done about this to fix it.

I have tried several in-ear headphones (philips, logitech, soundmagic) and it seems that some earphones pick up this EMI more than others. My best earphones, the Soundmagic E10, seem to pick up the EMI the most.

My question is: which in-ear headphones are a lot less sensitive to pick up EMI. On my previous cell, the Sony-Ericsson Xperia was sold with some in-ear phones that seem to be a lot less sensitive. Unfortunately, they don't work on the HTC due to a different plug standard.

Any advice?

R
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Old 04-19-2013, 12:26 PM
saratoga saratoga is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Sleep mode zZ View Post
Sensitivity rating is a more direct indication of sensitivity than impedance. It can be measured in dB/mW or dB/mV. Look for phones with as small rating as possible.
dB/mw includes the effect of impedance, dB/mV does not. So at equal dB/mV, a pair of 16 ohm headphones has +3 dB/mW.

FWIW, you can get impedance adapters for headphones. They add ~75 ohms output impedance. Not great for audio quality, but they do generally eliminate any background interference.
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Old 04-23-2013, 10:44 AM
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Frandroid Frandroid is offline
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I dont understand. What kind of interference are you talking about? Are you talking about the sound having noise? Do they hiss?
When you mentioned electromagnetic interference, I tought electric induction by a magnetic field but you cant get rid of that easily in this case.
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