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  #1  
Old 12-14-2007, 08:48 PM
moldavia moldavia is offline
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Default Linux and e280 microSD. [SOLVED]

Has anyone had luck accessing the microSD device with Linux? I have a 2GB microSD card in my e280, and Linux doesn't even tell me there's a device there beyond the 8GB player. No entry in /dev and fdisk only sees the hidden 20MB partition and the main partition.

Right now I am reduced to throwing it into a USB adapter (where it works like any other USB mass storage device) to do any file maintenance, or boot into Windows. No combination of kernel drivers seems to help either.

moldavia

Last edited by moldavia; 12-15-2007 at 04:57 PM. Reason: Fixed my own problem.
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  #2  
Old 12-14-2007, 08:53 PM
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Cruleworld Cruleworld is offline
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Do you have the player is MSC mode?
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Players: Zune 30GB (Music), iPod Touch 8GB 2g (Apps/Podcasts), Zune HD 32GB (sold to brother)
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  #3  
Old 12-14-2007, 09:02 PM
moldavia moldavia is offline
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Absolutely. A little more info, I am running on Slackware current (12.1?) I am not using any HAL auto-mounting. The player shows up as /dev/sdb1 and the hidden 20 MB partition is /dev/sdb2. other than my external HDD, there are no other USB entries in /dev. /proc/bus/devices doesn't offer any help beyond showing the player attached.


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Do you have the player is MSC mode?
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  #4  
Old 12-15-2007, 04:12 PM
moldavia moldavia is offline
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Default Solved!

It seems to be working now. I compiled the latest kernel 2.6.23.11 and enabled the SCSI option to probe all LUN's. I guess it was seeing the player and stopping there, not scanning for any other devices attached to the same bus. It's working just fine now.
In the kernel config, Device Drivers --> SCSI Devices --> Probe all LUN's on each device.
moldavia
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  #5  
Old 03-14-2008, 03:40 PM
Mainiak Blaniak Mainiak Blaniak is offline
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Please help a relative linux newbie...

How do I get to the 'kernel config' described above?? I am apparently trying to search on the wrong info on ubuntu forums and google, cause I can't find any info that I can make heads or tails of....

Running Ubuntu 7.10 with Sansa e250R

Thanks,

MB
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  #6  
Old 03-15-2008, 04:56 PM
Joe_Linux Joe_Linux is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainiak Blaniak View Post
Please help a relative linux newbie...

How do I get to the 'kernel config' described above?? I am apparently trying to search on the wrong info on ubuntu forums and google, cause I can't find any info that I can make heads or tails of....

Running Ubuntu 7.10 with Sansa e250R

Thanks,

MB
He's using Slackware which I believe is more oriented towards custom kernels. I believe you might have to recompile your kernel with the desired options. This isn't exactly easy. I've been using Linux exclusively for 5 + years and only tried to recompile the kernel once many years ago. Most distributions have custom kernels that are patched in one way or another. For what it's worth, I'm using Sidux Linux, which is based on Debian SID. It's a great distro, however it may not be the easiest to install for the inexperienced, but actually the install time is very quick. They have a good instruction manual though, and the advantage to Debian SID is that it is about as up to date as you can possible get. And yes there is no problem seeing the micro SD card with Sidux. I'd say it be easier to try a different distribution than to recompile the kernel.
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  #7  
Old 03-15-2008, 05:11 PM
Mainiak Blaniak Mainiak Blaniak is offline
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Joe,

Thanks for the input...

I was afraid someone was going to tell me that...through all the info I was able to find either via google or searching the ubuntu forums, the only way I saw was via the recompile kernel option. Though I have found a few how-to articles on doing this, the complexity level and amount of re-construction of my system afterwards that is apparently required has pretty much convinced me that I don't want to do this.

As my current ubuntu is set up on my spare 10 GB hard disk on a dual boot system, I am shortly going to be upgrading to add a new hard disk and re-install linux on it...maybe a different distro is the way to go at this point, though up to now I have been extremely happy with ubuntu, versus the very small amount of experience I had with Redhat and Xandros.

Anyway, thanks for the input...guess I'll keep using my sd card reader for now...

MB
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  #8  
Old 03-15-2008, 11:36 PM
Joe_Linux Joe_Linux is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainiak Blaniak View Post
Joe,

Thanks for the input...

I was afraid someone was going to tell me that...through all the info I was able to find either via google or searching the ubuntu forums, the only way I saw was via the recompile kernel option. Though I have found a few how-to articles on doing this, the complexity level and amount of re-construction of my system afterwards that is apparently required has pretty much convinced me that I don't want to do this.

As my current ubuntu is set up on my spare 10 GB hard disk on a dual boot system, I am shortly going to be upgrading to add a new hard disk and re-install linux on it...maybe a different distro is the way to go at this point, though up to now I have been extremely happy with ubuntu, versus the very small amount of experience I had with Redhat and Xandros.

Anyway, thanks for the input...guess I'll keep using my sd card reader for now...

MB

I just killed my micro SD card. I think they are rather temperamental. The first one I bought puked out in less than an hour. This one was good, but I should have taken it out before probing the Sansa USB with the various Rockbox tools. I know I got a corrupted file on it and that ended its life. Actually that's what happened before with the 1st one. So it could be that your OS is fine but your card is fluky. I've heard at the Linux club that all cards can be temperamental depending on the brand and the device. As for distros I do urge you to give Sidux a try. It's also a live CD and installs from the live CD. I've very pleased with it.
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  #9  
Old 03-17-2008, 04:18 PM
Mainiak Blaniak Mainiak Blaniak is offline
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Joe,

Thanks again for the input...however, I have to admit that this newbie is also an idiot !!!

I happened to have a flash of inspiration (or maybe it was the Killians?) because I realized that since the player is connecting to the pc via the OF, that maybe that is why the pc won't see my 4GB card because it is invisible to the OF. DOH!!! tried putting the 512MB card from my cell phone in the player, plugging in, and voila, there it was.

Hopefully my stupidity will help some future user...though probably not because they'll all catch on quicker than me!

Thanks again...

MB
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  #10  
Old 03-27-2008, 04:51 PM
zefrer zefrer is offline
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Hi,

Sorry for the bump but I had to reply to all the posts saying that re-compiling a kernel is hard.. It's actually easier than you might think.

Ok first of all you're going to need your kernel source code if it is not installed already. There will be a package called something like kernel-2.6.xx-dev or sources or something like that where xx is your current kernel version (uname -r) to find that out. On most rpm or debian based distributions(this covers most distributions) if you installed the kernel-sources package it will automatically install the correct version for you.

Now move cd into /usr/src/linux-2.6.xx. This is where the kernel sources reside. Now do an `ls .config*` to see if there are any config files in this directory. A .config file contains all the configuration used to make the kernel, we're looking for the config file used to make the default kernel for your distribution so we don't have to re-configure the whole thing, we just want to make one simple change.

If you don't see any files when you run that command then it is stored somewhere else for your distribution. In redhat it is in a file under /usr/src/linux-2.6.xx/configs/, in Ubuntu it is the /boot/.config-2.6.xx file. In both case cp the file to /usr/src/linux-2.6.xx/.config (if you don't call it .config then it won't be automatically loaded later..)

Now do a `make menuconfig` in the /usr/src/linux directory. If you haven't named your config .config then scroll down to the very bottom and hit "Load alternative configuration" and enter the filename. Now that you have your existing kernels config loaded you can proceed to the menu option Device Drivers --> SCSI Devices --> Probe all LUN's on each device. Press enter to go into Device drivers and SCSI devices and space to select "Probe all LUNs". That's all. Hit esc until you get to the main menu(hit esc twice to exit one menu level) and again till you get a message asking if you want to save your config, say yes, choose different filename if you wish.

Now again in the /usr/src/linux directory do `make all && make modules_install`. This will compile the kernel. Note that if you have the option to select "Probe all LUNs" as a module (try hitting "M" instead of space to select the option, an "M" next to it means it is going to be a module, an * means it is not) then you only have to do `make modules_install`.

Now copy the new kernel to your boot partition, first backing up your existing one (mv it to .old or something), copy the new kernel from /usr/src/linux-2.6.xx/boot/arch/i386/bzImage in an x86 kernel or /usr/src/linux-2.6.xx/boot/arch/x86-64/bzImage in an x86 64-bit kernel (etc for other architectures).
Copying bzImage is not needed if you can select the new option as a module, you just need to do `make modules_install`, don't even have to reboot in most cases.

Reboot, enjoy.

Is that really so hard?
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  #11  
Old 03-27-2008, 06:12 PM
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cpchan cpchan is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by zefrer View Post
Sorry for the bump but I had to reply to all the posts saying that re-compiling a kernel is hard.. It's actually easier than you might think.
True, I have been compiling my own kernels for many years. I was a big fan of the ck patchset while it lasted.

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Now move cd into /usr/src/linux-2.6.xx. This is where the kernel sources reside. Now do an `ls .config*` to see if there are any config files in this directory.
Actually the kernel of most distro these days are compiled with a kernel option to place a gzipped version of ".config" in /proc. All you need to do it to copy /proc/config.gz to the top level of your kernel source and ungzip it as .config.

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Now do a `make menuconfig` in the /usr/src/linux directory.
If the kernel version is not the same. One should do a "make oldconfig" before doing a "make menuconfig".

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Copying bzImage is not needed if you can select the new option as a module, you just need to do `make modules_install`, don't even have to reboot in most cases.
It is not needed if the kernel version is the same and that the new options enabled are compiled as modules. If it is a different kernel version, you might also want to copy System.map from the top level of your kernel source. Also, one will need to make a new initrd if the functions needed for booting the system are compiled as modules.

Charles
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  #12  
Old 03-28-2008, 04:50 AM
zefrer zefrer is offline
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Quote:
Actually the kernel of most distro these days are compiled with a kernel option to place a gzipped version of ".config" in /proc. All you need to do it to copy /proc/config.gz to the top level of your kernel source and ungzip it as .config.
True, forgot about that That's assuming of course they have this option turned on. I was going with the assumption that they're compiling the same kernel version as they're currently running, hence the use of the /usr/src/linux-`uname -r` directory. Initrd is not needed in this case as the LUNs option is not required during boot and everything else is still the same, same with system.map. Also a correction, bzImage is in /usr/src/linux/arch/x86_64/boot/ . I'm also a big fan of the ck patchset, too bad the guy stopped doing them I like the mm patchset these days although some version are a bit flaky - I generally use gentoo-sources tho (guess my distro! )
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  #13  
Old 03-28-2008, 03:52 PM
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cpchan cpchan is offline
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Quote:
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I'm also a big fan of the ck patchset, too bad the guy stopped doing them
Yes, it was a sad day when I saw the announcement on the ck mailinglist. However, I do understand and respect Con's decision. The sheduler, I don't really care anymore since the new CFS scheduler in the kernel is working just as well for interactive load. However, I still don't understand Linus' aversion to "Swap Prefetch".

Charles
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