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Old 06-13-2011, 11:10 AM
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collegefbfan8898 collegefbfan8898 is offline
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Default The Low Down on Ear Buds (NO HEARING LOSS)

I was searching around here and saw the info on hearing loss and ear buds/headphones. Someone had posted that they turn the volume up to drown out the mower. I do that, well not totally drown it out, but I can hear my tunes.

Are there some ear buds out there that won't break the bank (less than 20 bucks) and not contribute to hearing loss. I find that having my mp3 player going while I PUSH MOW (that is correct, push mow) my almost acre lawn makes the time and job go by so much faster.

I have always wondered about this being that my hearing is very good. I don't want to lose that.

Any help would be appreciated.
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Old 06-13-2011, 12:14 PM
k5r2an k5r2an is offline
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Instead of earbuds, I would recommend in-ear-monitors (IEM's) to protect your hearing. You can find a list of some cheap and good IEM's at this link: http://anythingbutipod.com/forum/showthread.php?t=69
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Old 06-13-2011, 12:31 PM
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What you are asking for does not exist other than ear plugs to protect your hearing. The fact is that if your lawn mower produces sound levels at 90 – 95dB, long exposure may result in hearing loss from it. IEM's may work but custom monitors do the best job of isolation (blocking out external sounds) but none can be found for the price you're looking to spend. Edit: you might want to try some inexpesive IEM's with good after market tips to see if you can block out most exterior sound and run at them at a level that does not cause damage to your hearing.

Not sure where I found the quote below but it's from one of those hearing sites ...

Quote:
... ... Sound levels at concerts can be in the range of 120 to 140 db, well beyond the 100 db normally recognized as the threshold at which short-duration exposure can cause hearing loss. The loss is caused by damage to fragile tissue strands within the cochlea. These strands are called hair cells and resemble tiny hairs. They move with the fluid in the cochlea to stimulate the electrical impulses in the auditory nerve. The hair cells become damaged in the presence of loud noise. ... ... ...

The mechanism of damage is much like the mechanism by which constant walking on grass can damage it. A person walking on a lawn occasionally doesn't damage the lawn, because the grass has a chance to recover between trampling. But if the grass is subjected to frequent traffic, it soon looses its ability to spring back and becomes permanently damaged. Damage to the hair cells occurs the same way. The louder and more frequent the exposure to loud noise, the more damage the hair cells sustain.
Edit: according to this chart a power mower produces around 107dB.
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Old 06-13-2011, 01:21 PM
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lestatar lestatar is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k5r2an View Post
Instead of earbuds, I would recommend in-ear-monitors (IEM's) to protect your hearing. You can find a list of some cheap and good IEM's at this link: http://anythingbutipod.com/forum/showthread.php?t=69
+1. That link is a great place to start.

Just for the record, EARBUDS look like this:

Earbuds sit outside your ear canal, resting on your inner earlobes


IEMs look like this:


IEMs fit inside your ear canal.

Many benefits to IEMs over earbuds IMO though the comfort/feeling of weirdness may take a tiny bit getting used to for some people.

IEMs can offer a bit of passive noise reduction - the tips [foam or silicon usually] provide a seal in your ear canal which can reduce outside noise. Also, IEMs can direct sound more precisely to your ears and a side benefit is that, when used responsibly, in conjunction with the varying levels of passive noise reduction, one can usually listen to music at lower, safer volumes without losing any musical enjoyment. There are some cons to IEMs as well, but hey, nothing's perfect.

As for lower priced, quality IEMs, look at old faves like the JVC Marshmallows. Also look hard at MEEElectronics stuff, which have been making very good, low priced IEMs of late.

hth and cheers!
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Old 06-13-2011, 01:48 PM
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Last time I mowed I used the MEElectronics M6 with the triple-flange. I would recommend pairing them up with some Comply foam tips though (which are expensive). Alternatively, I would get some JVC Marshmallows as they are the cheapest model I know of that comes with foam tips.
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Old 06-13-2011, 03:14 PM
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IDvsEGO IDvsEGO is offline
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IEMs with good isolation can block most of the external sound and make it possible to avoid cranking the volume. customs are the best for that, but are pricey. I have heard of some people using IEMs but putting can style hearing protection over them. supreme noise blockage.
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Old 06-13-2011, 03:43 PM
pseudohippy pseudohippy is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by IDvsEGO View Post
IEMs with good isolation can block most of the external sound and make it possible to avoid cranking the volume. customs are the best for that, but are pricey. I have heard of some people using IEMs but putting can style hearing protection over them. supreme noise blockage.
lol. That is exactly what I do, I wear my customs with my shooting ear muffs and I even use my shooting glasses in case of flying debris. I really never planned to tell anybody about that hehe, Im sure I look funny.
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Old 06-13-2011, 04:01 PM
skip252 skip252 is offline
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Bet it wouldn't look funny to me. I see the people that mow the grass for the Park District here in just about that all the time. The hearing protectors they wear aren't shooting muffs but have the same rating. Along with the required goggles it keeps both their eyes and hearing safe.

I had a chance to talk to one of them when I saw him wearing his earbuds under the hearing protector. He told me that the regs say their not supposed to do it but a lot of them do. Told me the cable coming out from under the cups breaks OSHA rules or some such.
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